Election hiccup: ousted candidate still manages to take 3rd place

In my electoral riding a candidate who had been fired just prior to the election still received 8,500+ votes, putting her in 3rd place, ahead of the Green candidate. Apparently her dismissal from the party happened after the ballots had been printed so her name couldn’t be removed, but seriously, did over 8,000 people in my community really not hear about her disgrace? Or did they favour her party so strongly that they were willing to waste their votes? Good gawd, she was removed for making homophobic comments! Would my neighbours vote for someone like that no matter which party she ran for? And it was a close race for the top 2 candidates. Those 8,000 votes placed elsewhere could have changed the outcome of this riding.

Perhaps I’m especially cranky that this could happen because my favourite candidate (and party) wasn’t elected, but still, there’s something wrong with this scenario.  And which is the worst explanation for this hiccup – ignorance or defiance? Sigh.

2 thoughts on “Election hiccup: ousted candidate still manages to take 3rd place

  1. Brian Mulligan

    I like your political rant.
    Side bar: Yesterday, I watched the Seahawks game in a bar with a road rider I met in Fountain Hills, Arizona. He goaded me into talking politics. I pumped the brakes but remained cordial and deflective. By the end of the game he said he had voted for Obama twice and was generally happy with his vote. Then he said “In 2016, I drank the cool aid and voted for Trump. I know he was just a publicity stunt but I thought it was important to vote when most Americans didn’t.”
    I guessed what I’m learning is that people are so focused on reasons not to vote for certain candidates that in the spirit of doing their patriotic thing – they are happy to waste their vote or worse yet – join a tribe.

    1. Shelley Hrdlitschka Post author

      That’s really interesting Brian, and so true. The whole idea of ‘strategic voting’ also frustrates me. If everyone voted from the heart what would the results look like? And what might the politicians learn from where the votes landed?

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